The best way to stay healthy is to prevent disease. Oral systemic health refers to the connection between oral health and overall health. Countless studies have demonstrated a link between poor oral health and systemic diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, stroke, dementia, rheumatoid arthritis, some forms of cancer, risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, such giving birth to a pre-term or low-birth weight baby. Since heart attacks are the biggest killer in North America and stroke is the biggest cause for disability, preventing these diseases deserves our full attention. Statistics show that today over 50% of Americans over 30 yrs. old have gum disease and it increases to 70% in adults

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The best way to stay healthy is to prevent disease. Oral systemic health refers to the connection between oral health and overall health. Countless studies have demonstrated a link between poor oral health and systemic diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, stroke, dementia, rheumatoid arthritis, some forms of cancer, risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, such giving birth to a pre-term or low-birth weight baby. Since heart attacks are the biggest killer in North America and stroke is the biggest cause for disability, preventing these diseases deserves our full attention. Statistics show that today over 50% of Americans over 30 yrs. old have gum disease and it increases to 70% in adults

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DID YOU KNOW? Many diseases are linked to your oral health, including heart disease, osteoporosis, oral cancer and diabetes. Gum disease begins when plaque adheres at and below the visible edge of your gums. If plaque is not removed every day by brushing and flossing, it hardens into tartar (also called calculus). Tartar promotes a bacterial infection at the point of attachment. In these early stages, gum disease is called gingivitis.   What if I am already in the early stages of gum disease? If you have gum disease, getting rid of plaque and tartar gives your gums a chance to get better. That’s why in the early stages of gum

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DID YOU KNOW? Many diseases are linked to your oral health, including heart disease, osteoporosis, oral cancer and diabetes. Gum disease begins when plaque adheres at and below the visible edge of your gums. If plaque is not removed every day by brushing and flossing, it hardens into tartar (also called calculus). Tartar promotes a bacterial infection at the point of attachment. In these early stages, gum disease is called gingivitis.   What if I am already in the early stages of gum disease? If you have gum disease, getting rid of plaque and tartar gives your gums a chance to get better. That’s why in the early stages of gum

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